Meet The Creatives: Susan Meinen

Go behind the designs in our new series which looks at the world of the makers who’ve shaped our collection this season. Next up: Susan Meinen, our head of print design.

Date

Monday, 9 September 2019

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Susan Meinen
Print designer

Prints are our thing, and the ones you see in our collections – everything from splashy florals, to bohemian toile de jouy, to tough street graphics – come from the freewheeling imagination of Susan, our head of print design. Working from our design studio – affectionately dubbed ‘The Church’ as it’s housed in a former 17th century church in the heart of Amsterdam – Susan and the super-talented team sketch nearly all our prints from scratch. That’s a lot of craft and love going into any one piece. Here, Susan, whose passion for prints is evident to anyone who meets her, literally – she’s covered in tattoos – talks us through her creative operandus and how it all started after she received a box of chalk from her dad.
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"I always start by hand: paper cut-outs, chalk sketches, painted artworks. Then I render my designs digitally, combining the organic handwriting with clean shapes to make them more modern."

"We like to tell a story in our graphics. Our prints are a fusion of different ideas from the team, which makes them really fun and interesting. And typically Scotch!"

Susan Meinen

"I think my love for graphics started with a box of chalk my dad gave me. And my mum’s make-up, which I used to mess up the white walls in our living room!"

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"Inspiration can come from anywhere: brainstorms with colleagues, drinks with friends, films, trips, books, music. Sometimes I even wake up with ideas, but they mostly arise during the creation process."
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"My first tattoo was a tribal design when I was 15. I love big pieces, not too scribbly. My biggest ones are a snake with Japanese peonies on my leg, and an eagle on my back inked by Marco Serio, my favourite tattoo artist."
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"One of my favourite prints this season is the toile de jouy. If you look closely, you can see there’s so much happening – the little humorous hints, like the sneaky snakes looking at you."